Forum Posts

Adam Mackey
Jul 08, 2022
In Athletics
I was fortunate enough to have spent the last two weeks abroad at the 2022 Arnold Palmer Cup, held at Golf Club de Genéve in Geneva, Switzerland. The GCAA staff spent months working towards this experience. I helped prepare the tournament program, write pre-tournament press releases, get social media ideas in line, fulfill media obligations, and get items shipped to their proper locations prior to traveling on-site, all while the spring 2022 season was finishing. Only so much of that preparation could gear us for the amount of off-the-course drama that came our way. Getting our participants onto location in one piece became more abstract than comprehensible. Much luggage, including a double-digit amount of golf bags needed for play, saw more of the world than their owners did. Some players had to play rounds of the tournament with rental clubs, if you can imagine that. One still hasn’t seen their clubs…. A $1,500 Uber from Heathrow airport to Geneva (680+ miles) was even taken due to travel stress. I will publish my journal from the trip's every day eventually, but the participants made everything worth it. The tournament began with a “Hello Friends, and welcome to the 2022 Arnold Palmer Cup” from Jim Nantz himself, which was even more awesome than it sounds. That utterance happened minutes before a strong thunderstorm brought our opening ceremonies inside to pandemonium. At least the pause gave everyone time to meet and greet. In a right place, right time moment, I got to lead Nantz around and through the chaos a little bit. The hospitality of Rolex, an important APC sponsor and Geneva native, was as good as advertised throughout. The evening spectacles around the town were special to witness, and lastly, the play lived up to the hype, with Team International using a triumphant final round to break the tie and defeat Team USA 33 to 27. The weather couldn’t have been better to match the level of play, as you will see in the below photos. The media fulfillments required for a tournament like this could not have been done without the help of do-it-all phenom Alex Gelman. Alex, who ran the @arnoldpalmercup social media and official photography throughout the experience, is the 2022 Ron Balicki Scholarship recipient, a John Reis Intern with the GCAA, travels with the Arizona State Men’s Golf program as their official broadcaster, and is a P.J. Boatwright Intern with the USGA and Arizona Golf Association (AGA), where he has worked two Patriot All-America Invitationals. He has immersed himself within the college golf landscape over the last year-plus and has such a bright future in front of him. The opening and closing ceremony photos seen below were taken by him. To me, the most rewarding feeling that came from this experience is the gratification our work gave to so many. Players came to us and said that they had the most fun they’ve ever had, be that in golf overall or amateur golf, at this tournament. “If you look back at the players who have played in this tournament before, it is a testament to how strong college golf is and where it’s headed,” one said. “Anytime that you get to represent your country, you’re very proud.” Sports Information Directors sent notes to Alex and me saying that we “absolutely CRUSHED it, I don't have enough kudos for you guys. Just outstanding coverage, photos --- just so, so, so helpful!” among other praises. Some sightseeing, almost two meals of Italian food per day on average, a plethora of tasty Swiss beer, incredible white Sangria, and decadent Swiss, Italian, and French desserts were consumed as well. See below for photographic highlights, and until next time, Arnold Palmer Cup, thank you. (I created the documents that the legend himself, Jim Nantz, is referring to:) (Each player and coach signs these two bags. One goes to the club and one to Rolex as a thank-you gift.) (Rachel Kuehn and Michael Brennan of Team USA got paired together to face Carolina Chacarra and Josele Ballester in Round 1's Mixed Four-Ball competition. Kuehn (far right), Brennan (middle right), Chacarra (middle left), and Team USA Assistant Coach Ryan Potter (far left) all come from Wake Forest, which is Arnold Palmer's alma mater, so it was very special to capture these moments.) (Just a couple of Stanford standouts sharing a Stanford ball-mark and pairing during the first round. Michael Thorbjornsen, left, has become a name to know in the golfing world these last few weeks, and Rose Zhang, right, won the individual national championship, every national individual award, and is the No. 1-ranked amateur in the world at 19 years old.) (What a view of Mount Blanc, the highest mountain in the Alps and Western Europe, and the 11th most prominent mountain summit on Earth.) (Kuehn, left, and Brennan, right, were paired again for Round 3, where they provided fireworks late to secure a big victory for Team USA.) (This photo is from the final round. Aline Krauter and Rachel Heck are teammates at Stanford and welcomed a picture with the walking standard.) (Chiara Tamburlini, the St. Gallen, Switzerland, native, posing with family members before Sunday's final round.) (Fresh of his fourth-place finish at the PGA Tour's 2022 Travelers Championship just three days prior to arriving in Geneva, it was a pleasure seeing and getting to know Thorbjornsen in his element. He's off to superb things in his career.) (Got to know and gain contact with Ashley Lau, who owns eight University of Michigan program records and became the first U-M player to play in the Arnold Palmer Cup. She is back in Ann Arbor beginning her Masters program, and I cannot wait to see what her future holds.) (On February 13, 2002, former Penn State University golfer and GCAA Arnold Palmer Cup intern Michael Carter died in an automobile accident at the young age of 19. While Carter tragically left this world too soon, his infectiously fun-loving spirit will forever live in this competition. The Michael Carter “Junior” Memorial Award is presented to the Arnold Palmer Cup participant from each team who best represents the qualities and ideals that made this young man unique. The 2022 recipients were James Leow, right, and Cole Sherwood, left.) (Team International - 2022 Arnold Palmer Cup Champions.) (Mateo Fernández de Oliveira became the first Arnold Palmer Cup participant from Argentina.) (Fred Biondi became the first Arnold Palmer Cup participant from Brazil.) (Leow became the first Arnold Palmer Cup participant from Singapore.) (Biondi, left, and Fernández de Oliveira celebrating their victories on Sunday.) (Heather Lin, left, and Christo Lamprecht, right, requested a photo with each other because they had so much fun being paired together this week.) (From Évian-les-Bains, France, home to the worldwide evian Natural Spring Water.) (A splash of Lake Geneva water.) (Some incredible views from Yvoire, France, a location our Uber driver took us to.) (This was the most popular hangout spot for the APC during our stay. Hôtel Métropole Genève, where the players were staying, housed a rooftop bar with this view. Many nights, beverages, pictures, and a few cigars were shared on that rooftop.) (Thought to record a time-lapse on our trolley ride back from the yacht club, where we had drinks and snacks at, on Sunday evening.) (A view of Geneva's past.) (The view from our office at Golf Club de Genéve.) (As the players were arriving, six of them that arrived earlier got to be a part of a junior clinic at the course, working with and showing an abundance of youth their craft. The signed autographs after and were just so wonderful with everyone.)
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Adam Mackey
Jun 10, 2022
In Athletics
Immortality, A word so impactful and rewarding, it is commonly used to describe championship-winning athletes. Ones that break records and put their sport in a brighter light. In the not even eight months I’ve been in Norman, I’ve seen OU athletes compete in numerous postseasons, win plenty of individual honors, compete for a handful of championships, and bring together sport-loving communities along the way. Within all of it were two team national champions in sports I’ve strengthened my knowledge of through them. Women’s gymnastics was the first. I’ve come to learn about Norman’s rich and distinct gymnastics history, both in women’s and men’s, and it was so much fun attending their events and becoming a fan during their championship runs (the men finished as national runner-up). My mementos from this season included autographs from each gymnast, multiple items of apparel, and a fateful experience meeting some of their family members. Softball is the second. It’s been an absolute blast being indoctrinated into the atmosphere that surrounds one of the deepest and most dominant teams in collegiate sports history. I intently watched the 2021 Women’s College World Series, where I innocently rooted for the underdogs instead of the Sooners. OU’s record-breaking roster made many fans then, but this 2022 season has been like a more-appealing sequel. This year’s team didn’t just break many of the same records they broke last year, they broke even more sport-wide records throughout the season, including multiple WCWS records that have lasted decades. A handful of their games were broadcasted live on national television, including being a playing member in the first college softball game to ever be televised on ABC. Multiple of their games in the WCWS broke event attendance records; to put that into perspective, yes, the USA Softball Hall of Fame Stadium is just up the road in Oklahoma City, but in comparison, that stadium can hold over 12,500 fans, where Marita Hynes Field can only take 1,378. It was incredibly rare to find a ticket under $50 to watch OU Softball play this season. Many of their home games costed over $100 per ticket. Whether it was through autograph sessions, social media, licensed AND personalized memorabilia, or fateful experiences on top of parking structures, I was lucky enough to have my fair share of time with this team. They have fun like normal people, they are loving like normal people, but their superstar statuses elevate their level of celebrity within the community. Read more about the teams' accomplishments from this article written by ESPN's Alex Scarborough. The most-known name on the team is Jocelyn Alo, properly nicknamed the Home Run Queen. The individual records she broke grew as the season went on, and they are plentiful, but her background is the most badass part of her story. ESPN did a Cover Story titled “Oklahoma softball and the secrets behind the most dominant team in sports” in May, which you can read here. A statue in Norman is next in her Sooner sights:) And how did it all cap off? By charging past Red River rival Texas in two of two games to capture their second-straight national title and fifth in the last nine seasons. Work has been so insanely busy of late, but being able to lean on the success of these winter/spring sports has been a saving grace. It helps that I work for a spring/summer sport, but I will always cherish these moments, as they aren't made to be taken for granted. They are made to live on forever, just as these teams will here in Norman. One last thing to say: LET'S GO BABY, BOOMER
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Adam Mackey
Mar 21, 2022
In Athletics
With all of the thrill that occurred and jaw-dropping moments we saw, these last seven days have to go into the books as one of the greatest stretches of collective college basketball in history. That goes for both men and women. There were so many incredibly high-octane games with incredible finishes that it was simply astonishing to watch/witness. So much talent, emotion, and intensity was on display that was mixed in with oh so much nerve. My school might have been beaten in an instant classic, but this is what March is all about. The women’s tournament saw numerous improbable upsets with growing crowds by the game during this span. Iowa sold out their games at Carver-Hawkeye Arena (that’s over 15,000 fans per game). Creighton came into Iowa City and stunned everyone when their Iowa transfer hit the game-winning three🤯 The images you see below are from fans who have been itching for NCAA Tournament action for some time, and the atmospheres were the best I’ve seen for any OU game(s) in my time here. Crowds like these and national exposure like this is exactly what the sport has needed for so long, and I’m blessed to be a small part of it.
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Adam Mackey
Mar 05, 2022
In Athletics
The last two national champions. The top two finishers at the 2021 NCAA Championships. Winners of four of the last five national championships. Numerous All-Americans with multiple conference and regional championships competing. Impressively-high scores up and down the rosters. Senior night in Norman. Did I miss anything? Oh yeah, No. 1 Michigan at No. 2 Oklahoma. Firstly, it was a welcomed sight for a team from Michigan to be competing in Norman. I was looking forward to this meet for weeks and not being one of the only Michiganders in the building😁. Secondly, the atmosphere was simply exceptional. 8,000+ invested fans who stayed with it throughout the entire night, especially as scores got incredibly high (season and school-record bests for some at that). It really sucked that not everyone could win, because the competition was just that good. Thirdly, the level of excitement and fun the athletes show each and every rep, even in these high-pressure types of moment, is always good to see. Gymnastics is one of the most technically-challenging and bodily-demanding sports in existence, so it is important for the athletes to show their spirit and camaraderie. Lastly, it has been such a pleasure getting more into collegiate gymnastics this season. The scores across the country have never been this consistently high, and there is star power all over the place. I cannot wait for the postseason (some of which will be hosted by OU👀), and let’s keep this energy up! View my photo gallery from the meet below⬇️
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Adam Mackey
Aug 09, 2021
In Athletics
Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. July 23 - August 8, 2021. Games of the XXXII Olympiad. This post serves as a personal reflection documenting long-winded emotions, conversational points and earned respect to all who lived/captured/experienced them. I feel it important to write this for so many reasons, ones that go beyond athletic fandom. Yes, sports have been a part of my life since the beginning and they course through my veins. Yes, I spent most of my waking hours during those 17 days surrounded by Olympic coverage. Yes, I have and will continue to build an employment portfolio in athletics. But these Games were so much more. Take it from this montage that concluded the coverage on August 8: https://youtu.be/EGuMooA9Cgw I watched that montage live and have watched it multiple times since. Tears filled my eyes each time. There's something so mesmerizing about watching people fulfill lifelong dreams and goals. There's something so breathtaking witnessing people experience the fine line between triumph and heartbreak. There's something so motivating about following and learning from people who have the ability to share their stories, setbacks and backgrounds. All while going through a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic and a year-long postponement. Can you imagine what these participants (event volunteers included) have gone through? What participants in and with sports that require such meticulous, body-specific and age-defining training where every single second, day, week, month and year weighs so heavily, have endured? Yet some media, be it on social media or other forms, mocked them. One of the most common opinions I've come across, especially over the last few years, is that being open about mental health shows a sign of "copping out", "disgrace" or "letting others down." To touch on a specific example, there's only one Simone Biles; only one person who endures the pressure, attention and want for whatever "perfection" means 24/7 that Simone Biles has to; only one person who has lived the young life Simone Biles has (she's still only 24 years old, remember). This is the theme that plays true to anyone who chooses to use their platforms to speak up like Simone has, such as Naomi Osaka, Michael Phelps, Kevin Love and so many others. Since not one single person on this planet has experienced what she has, why are people so quick to point fingers or make judgements on matters they know nothing at all about? Your status doesn't make you more or less human than anyone else. That fact falls on deaf ears way too often. So a much-earned and respected thank you goes out to any Olympic participant who made mental health, their own or collectively, a priority and will continue doing so. I cannot conclude this post without celebrating the women of these Olympics for their historic achievements on and off the playing surface: "Tokyo 2020 was the first Olympics in which trans women were permitted to compete in women's categories, with Laurel Hubbard entering the women's super heavyweight weightlifting event.[94]. Women competed in softball, karate, sport climbing, surfing, and skateboarding at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.[95] The new sports climbing events - speed climbing, bouldering, and lead climbing - all had men's and women's categories.[96] Several sports, such as swimming, introduced mixed events.[97]. The length of tennis matches were changed so that men played three sets, the same as women in all previous Olympics.[98]" (percentage of all women, not just from Team USA) (to name a few) (how about the U.S. Medalists By Gender?!) As much as this post is one for the time capsule, I equally hope that it continues pushing the narrative for continuous dialogue about the Olympics, mental health awareness, women in sports and countless other important topics that made appearances. The blessing in disguise from these one-of-a-kind Games is that the 2020 Summer Paralympics (August 24 - September 5, 2021), the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing (February 4 - 20, 2022) and the 2022 Winter Paralympics (March 4 - 13, 2022) are right around the corner! Congratulations and thank you to all for making this (safely) possible!
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Adam Mackey
Jul 08, 2021
In Employment
Recently saw this on Twitter and I feel that it provides a good starting point to something that’s been on my mind recently. No matter if you’re the hiring manager or whatever other position(s) you hold with the employer, you’re human first and foremost. That seems to be forgotten more often than not in the hiring process, at least in my experience. As someone who’s taken the time, effort and energy to participate in over 300 job applications since January, which then leads to x number of interviews and/or rejections, it irks me that too many people involved with hiring miss the mark on opportunities to give and receive feedback and treat others as they’d like to be treated. Be the amount of traffic for that specific application as it may, the platforms to communicate are greater now than ever before, yet way too few professionals I’ve personally reached out to, via email or direct messaging with personalized application materials, for guidance, opportunities or a simple hello, have replied. That’s just sad, in my opinion. A reply to the attached tweet said that “a job interview is as much for the interviewer as the interviewee. Anyone who would treat someone like this before they were even hired, is someone I would not work for. They simply have no respect for you. No amount of money is worth that.” Even if you aren’t or weren’t directly in the same shoes I’m in now, you were in them at least indirectly because you had to search for the position(s) you’re currently in. Your workplace title doesn’t make you any more or less human than I am. If you think my reaching out to you wastes your time, don’t forget that you’re wasting the exact same amount of time choosing not to respond. The fact that we’re all in this together will forever remain and prop my reasoning for lending my help in any way I can to anyone who needs or wants it. 🙏
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Adam Mackey
Jun 20, 2021
In Education
"Do I believe people are better together? Yes." - Sharron Reed-Davis On June 19, 2021, Michigan State University held it's inaugural Juneteenth Celebration on campus. 16 faculty members, involved students and alumni, educators, artists and musicians provided information and entertainment to historically and locally represent the holiday. (the event's poster) Dr. Nakia D. Parker, a Dean's Research Associate in the College of Social Science and professor in the Department of History, gave a brief history of Juneteenth that included preliminary information provided in this link here. "This collection captures the stories of former slaves in their own words and voices. Only 26 audio-recorded interviews of ex-slaves have been found." Incredibly fascinating to me. Head Football Coach Mel Tucker stopped by and spoke about what Juneteenth means to him. He is one of 13 Black head coaches in FBS college football. 13 Black coaches of 130 teams. He talked about this not so much being a celebration for him but a time of reflection, "where we were then and where we are now." His sons are 19 and 17-years old, respectively, so he also talked about how important is it for him to not just be a mentor for his community but also at home. He stayed a while longer to speak with attendees and faculty members and such as well. (Coach Mel Tucker speaking) Two of the speakers who received some of the loudest applause were Dr. Lee N. June and Dr. Rema Vassar. Dr. June, a lifelong activist and a current professor in the Honors College, the Department of Psychology and the African American and African Studies Program, spoke about what he's seen and hopes he will continue to see as societal injustices make their way into common conversation. "We should not be celebrating something that shouldn’t have happened in the first place," he said while calling Juneteenth more of a commemoration than a celebration. His passionate body language and words reverberated into the audience and beyond. As a storm blew through the event, he even said that "rain came but did not impede on John Lewis and Dr. King’s March to Selma." Lastly, a book that Dr. June suggested to read is titled Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome by Dr. Joy DeGruy. (Dr. June speaking) Dr. Vassar, the Morris Endowed Chair leading The Leadership Talent Development Project in the Detroit Public Schools Community District and the newest member of Michigan State's Board of Trustees, spoke so personably and thrived with it throughout. "When I think of Black, I think of brilliance, boldness and beauty," she said. She also made a distinction between education and learning and emphasized the importance of reading. "Education is about your credentials; Learning is about being in these spaces, and when we show up, we change these spaces." "You need to learn from your experiences in order to combat them." The current students that spoke, including Reed-Davis and Dantevius Branigan, are all incredibly involved in their inclusive and outreach ventures on campus and were proud yet continually-learning speakers. "The past wasn't that long ago," Branigan said. During Dr, Vassar's speech, I learned that the first Black female graduate of MSU was in 1907 while the first Black male graduated from MSU in 1904. A passionate alumna, Felicia Wasson, ended her speech by saying that "the struggle continues" for a subtle yet powerful statement. The fact that the number of Black tenured system faculty members at MSU has dropped from 105 in 2006 to 86 in 2016 among countless other institutional and societal data would suggest that Wasson is more than correct. I have dedicated the last year and will continue dedicating myself to listening and learning about historical and systemic injustices that plaque our communities and what I could do to help. I thoroughly enjoyed attending this event today and thank all that worked to put it on.
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Adam Mackey
Jun 08, 2021
In Education
I feel that it is extremely important to normalize the necessity that, before being assigned any course (specifically in higher education), the teacher has a proven track record to help students achieve in the classroom. The best teachers I’ve had in higher education either have displayed a strong balance in both field and teaching experience or have much more field experience but have the inclination of gaining feedback from their students/peers on their teaching performance. This and a proven track record are also known as ACTIONS SPEAKING LOUDER THAN WORDS. I could get any degree, let’s loosely say a Ph.D in this case, in any subject and be an atrocious teacher. I could get 61% in every single class I took and paper I wrote and have minimal at best field experience yet still have Ph.D., but would my backstory make me the “best fit” to teach the course? Do you see how flawed that is? I don’t care if you have this award or that title; if you can’t read a room or have acted-upon proof that you can and do deploy proper teaching skills in the name of your students, you don’t deserve to be assigned the course. Plain and simple. Proper teaching skills, in simplest terms, means being resourceful and trustworthy to your students. A friend of mine who works in education said that “the sad thing about professors is that they more likely than not don’t have teaching degrees, just a bunch of research in their background. That’s not bad per se, but their standard is set so high and they don’t ever learn how (people) learn.” My educational experiences fall directly in line with that and one of main reasons why working in an educational setting interests me. I might just create an entire post about this, but a specific something that I believe needs to be further disseminated within schools is mental health education. That means providing everyone involved with education further resources for learning about the spectrum of mental health. I believe that mental health awareness in academia can open the door for infinite improvement, improvement that can expand to other necessary topics of discussion like systemic racism, adulthood studies and personal finance.
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Adam Mackey
Jun 07, 2021
In Relationships
If you point the finger at other people before/without having the tough conversations, like if you ghost that person without explanation just because you disagree with something, for example, but also don’t speak up about the situation, you’re the problem person. Especially here in America, so many people confuse freedom with ignorance. As mentioned in the previous post, I view life like driving: Yes it may be your car or yes you may be the one driving, but you aren’t the only one on the road. In any kind of traffic, you can’t just plow through everybody to get to your destination, because what if everyone tried to do the same thing? You have to abide by the rules of the road first and foremost, meaning who and what surrounds you on all sides. Everyone else on the road has to do the same. That’s the only way driving, and life, can work. This is seen every single day in America (you name the examples). There are many freedoms within America, but the freedom of togetherness, aka companionship, isn’t a one-person band. That’s missed a lot these days, especially within the social media culture, a place where some go for guidance. It was Abraham Lincoln who said “you cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.” That’s important to realize because we all have things going on, varying in severity, but that things don’t just manifest in front of us. It takes grunt work from each side to help. If you’re willing to do that, along with stepping into each others' shoes and take the time to listen and understand, anything is possible. Also, freedoms aren’t mutually exclusive. If you don’t also understand the existence of ramifications to what you’re saying or doing, that freedom turns into ignorance. We’re told when we’re young that the “world is my oyster.” But truly, does the whole world revolve around any one of us? Are your opinions, goals, dreams, hobbies, etc. all that matters in this world? Your world may and just may revolve around you, but holistically, your opinions and perspectives only count for one, just like those of the people on all sides of you. You don’t live in your world; you live in the world. It’s important to express yourself, but you can’t diminish or judge anyone else if you’re not going to take the time and energy to do three things that I’ve learned through experience: listen actively, balance and understand the perspectives at play, and walk the talk. If/when privileges are involved, those that are privileged need to understand the importance of these notions. If you aren’t seeing, understanding and appreciating your privileges, if you misuse them, you’ll lose them. In the case of walking the talk, something I think about here is the example of the challenge scenes in Black Panther. It’s first T’Challa than Killmonger in a later challenge who have to swallow a potion that alleviates their superior physicality given to them by rule to allow for a fair fight. That superior physicality is earned by winning the challenge, aka walking the walk. The same thing goes with our society here. If you care enough about the person/situation, you’ll see, appreciate and understand your privileges and how they coincide with the person/situation. You’ll go the extra mile (if not longer) for them/it in doing so and work together to concur the obstacles. That’s true friendship.
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Adam Mackey
Jun 07, 2021
In Relationships
One of the most painstaking realities I’ve come to learn is that those that need to be listening tend not to. Be those as they may, as I think that we all fall into that category in at least one context, but one of the emptiest feelings I've experienced is when my emotions and/or experiences fall on deaf ears. It’s almost like you’re invisible even though you’re directly surrounded by people. Similarly, I view life like driving. Yes it may be your car or yes you may be the one driving, but you aren’t the only one on the road. In any kind of traffic, you can’t just plow through everybody to get to your destination, because what if everyone tried to do the same thing? You have to abide by the rules of the road first and foremost, meaning who and what surrounds you on all sides. Everyone else on the road has to do the same. That’s the only way driving, and life, can work. Something my dad has driven into me my whole life is that we have two ears and one mouth for a reason. You can’t possibly expect to prosper in life if you don’t learn how to listen. I’ve experienced direct incidences of this in multiple capacities throughout my life and I just hope that we all can understand that we as individuals aren't the only ones here. More to come on that in proceeding posts.
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Adam Mackey
Jun 07, 2021
In Employment
Through both direct and indirect experience, I have come to learn how inconsiderately inhumane some if not many employers are. I received an email one morning saying that I "am not the right fit for the position at this time" and that this potential employer is "sorry for the disappointing news." They didn't speak to me for even one fraction of a second yet word their exit email like that. Pro tip: There are countless ways to bid your farewell to an applicant and the above example is not one. I took three organizational leadership skills courses, while getting my Masters degree (one in an HR concentration, one in a Communication concentration and one in an Organizational Leadership and Supervision concentration). One of the (many) things I learned is that, in order to be treated how you would like to be treated, you have to treat them the way they would like to be treated first. That isn't taught enough, as I'm sure you have your own personal examples on the subject. The fun fact is, if you want to bring in the "best" employee, you have to be the "best" employer first. Especially if you require the applicant to submit a resume, cover letter and a filled-out application that just repeats the information that is in the resume and cover letter, offer time to the applicant in the interview process for "pick my brain" questions so everyone has the opportunity to be on the same page. If that applicant is "not the right fit at this time" for the role, no matter if they get an interview or not, either provide feedback on what could help them moving forward or simply thank them for taking the time to apply. I know that these things happen in the employment process, including management issues with high volumes of applicants, but the impersonal nature of too many employers rubs me the wrong way. Don't just do better; be better. Thank you.
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